Captain Marvel

CaptainMarvel

Directed By: Anna Boden & Ryan Fleck
Starring: Brie Larson, Samuel L. Jackson, Jude Law, Clark Gregg, Gemma Chan, Annette Bening, Djimon Hounsou, Ben Mendelsohn, Lee Pace, Lashana Lynch, et.al.
Rating: PG-13
Grade: B+

When Kree Starforce officer Vers is taken by Skrull operatives and has her memories searched, she is shown events she can’t recall living through. After escaping, she crash lands on Earth, where she meets Agent Nick Fury. Coming to a truce of sorts, Fury agrees to help her get information about Dr. Wendy Lawson, one of the people in the memories that were searched, who was working on an experimental engine that the Skrulls were looking for. As she spends more time on Earth, she eventually learns that her name is actually Captain Carol Danvers, an Air Force pilot who went missing after the experimental craft she was test piloting crashed and killed Dr. Lawson. No longer certain of who she can and can’t trust, Carol joins forces with Fury in an effort to unravel the mystery behind her missing memories and the source of the extraordinary powers she possesses.

Captain Marvel is the 21st movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), and is the first one to center on a female superhero. The introduction of Captain Marvel was long-awaited, and planned as far back as the first Avengers movie in 2012. The movie itself is very good, but falls a little short of amazing. Many fans have been critical of Marvel for ensuring they had a profitable idea before venturing into diversifying their leads, but wait was mostly worth it. It was interesting to see a couple of fan-favorite characters before the “official” start of the MCU, though the CGI de-aging was a bit disconcerting at times. The new characters introduced all fit into the established universe well, and Marvel continues to stock their roster of A-List actors in their movies. The storyline itself is fairly easy to follow, and while the twist near the end may not be jaw-dropping, it’s nice to see that they’re still trying to keep fans on their toes after 10+ years.

The special effects are all very well done, as is the case with nearly every Marvel movie, and the background filler isn’t noticeable.

Fans of the MCU, as well as anyone looking for a movie starring a kick-ass heroine, should enjoy this movie. Since it’s an origin story, you don’t necessarily need to be familiar with the rest of the MCU movies in order to understand what’s going on. Young girls in particular will probably like a movie with a strong female lead, which, while there are more movies with them being made, there’s still a serious lack positive role models and women carrying movies.

Captain Marvel is not currently available free to stream anywhere, but can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.

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Glass

Glass

Directed By: M. Night Shyamalan
Starring: Samuel L. Jackson, James McAvoy, Bruce Willis, Anya Taylor-Joy, Sarah Paulson, Spencer Treat Clark, Charlayne Woodard, Luke Kirby, et.al.
Rating: PG-13
Grade: A

After former security guard David Dunn tracks down and aids in the capture of The Horde, the savage alter ego of Kevin Wendell Crumb, he himself is arrested and placed in a mental institution with not only Crumb, but Elijah Price, the man who attempted to murder him nearly 20 years earlier. As the three are held, they are interviewed by Dr. Ellie Staple, who attempts to convince them that they do not, in fact, have super powers, and that the amazing feats they have accomplished are merely a coincidence.

The final movie in M. Night Shyamalan’s superhero trilogy is an excellent addition to the writer/director’s rocky filmmaking career. While his ending twist isn’t quite as shocking as his Sixth Sense reveal, it’s still enough to make you stop and think for a little while. Jackson and Willis slip easily back into the roles they haven’t played in two decades, and McAvoy again gives a scene-stealing performance as someone with multiple personalities. Sarah Paulson’s performance as the therapist tasked with convincing the others that there is no such thing as superheroes is well done and infused with just enough insistence to make you wonder if there’s something she’s not telling you.

The special effects are well done, and the background filler is not noticeable.

As stated before, this movie is a step towards Shyamalan’s previous status as a masterful storyteller. After years of missteps, he seems to be getting his feet back under him. Anyone who liked the previous two installments of this trilogy, ‘Unbreakable’ and ‘Split’, should like this movie, though it’s not really necessary to watch them to enjoy it as they do a quick review of them in the movie. It should also appeal to anyone who’s a fan of the main actors, as well as anyone looking for slightly different type of action/drama.

Glass is not available free to stream anywhere at the moment, but can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.