Long Shot

LongShot

Directed By: Jonathan Levine
Starring: Charlize Theron, Seth Rogen, June Diane Raphael, O’Shea Jackson Jr., Ravi Patel, Bob Odenkirk, Andy Serkis, Randall Park, Alexander Skarsgård, et.al.
Rating: R
Grade: C+

After quitting his job as a reporter for The Brooklyn Advocate when he believes that they have sold out, Fred Flarsky, along with his best friend Lance, attends a concert where he runs into Charlotte Field, his former babysitter and childhood crush, who is now the US Secretary of State and a potential presidential candidate in the upcoming election. Charlotte, believing her speeches need to be overhauled, hires Fred on as a staff writer to help voters relate to her more. As they reconnect and get to know each other as adults over the course of her campaign, Fred and Charlotte begin to develop feelings for each other. However, when a scandal surrounding Fred is brought to light, Charlotte must decide whether to dismiss him from the campaign and protect her reputation, or follow her heart and keep him around.

Seth Rogen seems to be one of those who can toe the line between a typical romantic comedy and the frat-style gross out comedy he’s better known for. This movie, while far better than his previous attempt at creating a hybrid gross out/RomCom, still seems to not know whether it wants to fully commit to a comedy style fully. At times it pushes into full-on RomCom territory, then slides back into gross out territory. Though, I will say, for the most part it handles to balance fairly well. Despite the fact that they seem to be an odd pairing, Rogen and Theron have a decent chemistry together, and the way the story unfolds, combined with Rogen’s strangely affable charm, it doesn’t seem entirely outside the realm of possibility that her character would be interested in his.

There aren’t many special effects used, and the background filler isn’t noticeable.

It’s hard to pinpoint a demographic for this movie. Parts of it may be too romance-y for fans of frat humor, and likewise, some of it will be too frat-y for fans of RomComs. I would suggest that most fans of either genre give it a watch. At the very least, it’s worth the price of a rental, and you may be surprised by how much you don’t hate it.

Long Shot is currently not available free to stream anywhere at the moment, but can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.

Cairo Time

CairoTime2

Directed By: Ruba Nadda
Starring: Patricia Clarkson, Alexander Siddig, Elena Ayana, Amina Annabi, Tom McCamus, Mona Hala, Fadia Nadda, et.al.
Rating: PG
Grade: A-

When Juliette goes to Cairo to meet with her husband, Mark, who is a UN official working with the refugee camps, she finds that he is delayed by rising tensions, and that she has been left to fend for herself, with only Tareq, her husband’s former head of security for company. Weary of exploring the city on her own, Juliette begins to seek out Tareq’s company, both as a form of protection and also so that she has someone to share the experience with. However, as more time passes, Juliette and Tareq begin to realize that their easy friendship has developed into something more.

Every now and then I watch something that seems completely off-kilter with my usual tastes in movies and television. This was one of the few times I was pleasantly surprised. A slow-burning, ultimately chaste romance story about what equates to an emotional affair between a married woman and a close friend of her husband’s. The Egyptian backdrop is beautiful to look at and adds to the romantic setting. Clarkson and Siddig have amazing chemistry, and it’s nice to have an acknowledgment that people in their 40s and 50s still have desires.

There aren’t any obvious special effects, and the background filler isn’t noticeable.

Anyone who doesn’t mind a slow-burn romantic drama will enjoy this movie, and I would definitely recommend putting in the effort to find it somewhere (the only places that carry the movie digitally that I could find were iTunes and Google Play). While it may not be something you would want to watch all the time, it’s definitely something I can see people wanting to watch every now and then when they need a dose of something made by a hopeless romantic.

Cairo Time is not currently available free to stream anywhere, but can be rented through Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.