Aquaman

Aquaman

Directed By: James Wan
Starring: Jason Momoa, Amber Heard, Willem Dafoe, Patrick Wilson, Nicole Kidman, Temuera Morrison, Dolph Lundgren, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Randall Park, et.al.
Rating: PG-13
Grade: B

Born to a human man and the Queen of Atlantis, Arthur Curry has grown up always knowing he was of two vastly different worlds. In the aftermath of joining the Justice League and assisting them, Arthur has been helping fight crimes in the oceans and seas, earning himself the name of Aquaman. However, after a woman named Mera arrives and tells Arthur that his younger half-brother, Orm, is planning on taking control of the divided factions of Atlanteans and waging a war on the surface world, Arthur begrudgingly accepts that the time has come for him to take his place among the Atlanteans and try to protect the surface world he loves.

One of DC’s attempts to build an integrated world in the same vein as the MCU, Aquaman is surprisingly not terrible. While it’s not perfect, it’s definitely a step in the right direction for the DCEU. The storyline is decent, and makes for a good introduction to the character, which was glossed over in his ‘Justice League’ debut, though there is an unnecessary subplot involving a character some have guessed to be the planned villain for the eventual sequel. While I’m not a huge fan of Amber Heard, she seems to do a decent job here and she has chemistry with Jason Momoa. Nicole Kidman does a good job with her small role as Arthur’s mother, Queen Atlanna, which is her first comic book role.

The special effects aren’t the best I’ve ever seen, but they’re not the worst either, and the background filler is not noticeable.

Despite the somewhat unnecessary subplot, this movie is still enjoyable. The biggest problem is that this movie came after ‘Justice League,’ which was DC’s attempt to catch up with the MCU in terms of a centralized, integrated universe, which, honestly, someone could fill a book about. Still, as more of the individual movies are made, DC gains a bit more traction back. Since it doesn’t rely heavily on previous installments, it can be watched without having seen the other ‘Justice League’-verse movies.

Aquaman is not available free to stream anywhere at the moment unless you have HBO, but can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.

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Glass

Glass

Directed By: M. Night Shyamalan
Starring: Samuel L. Jackson, James McAvoy, Bruce Willis, Anya Taylor-Joy, Sarah Paulson, Spencer Treat Clark, Charlayne Woodard, Luke Kirby, et.al.
Rating: PG-13
Grade: A

After former security guard David Dunn tracks down and aids in the capture of The Horde, the savage alter ego of Kevin Wendell Crumb, he himself is arrested and placed in a mental institution with not only Crumb, but Elijah Price, the man who attempted to murder him nearly 20 years earlier. As the three are held, they are interviewed by Dr. Ellie Staple, who attempts to convince them that they do not, in fact, have super powers, and that the amazing feats they have accomplished are merely a coincidence.

The final movie in M. Night Shyamalan’s superhero trilogy is an excellent addition to the writer/director’s rocky filmmaking career. While his ending twist isn’t quite as shocking as his Sixth Sense reveal, it’s still enough to make you stop and think for a little while. Jackson and Willis slip easily back into the roles they haven’t played in two decades, and McAvoy again gives a scene-stealing performance as someone with multiple personalities. Sarah Paulson’s performance as the therapist tasked with convincing the others that there is no such thing as superheroes is well done and infused with just enough insistence to make you wonder if there’s something she’s not telling you.

The special effects are well done, and the background filler is not noticeable.

As stated before, this movie is a step towards Shyamalan’s previous status as a masterful storyteller. After years of missteps, he seems to be getting his feet back under him. Anyone who liked the previous two installments of this trilogy, ‘Unbreakable’ and ‘Split’, should like this movie, though it’s not really necessary to watch them to enjoy it as they do a quick review of them in the movie. It should also appeal to anyone who’s a fan of the main actors, as well as anyone looking for slightly different type of action/drama.

Glass is not available free to stream anywhere at the moment, but can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.