The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

ManWhoKilledDQ

Directed By: Terry Gilliam
Starring: Adam Driver, Jonathan Pryce, Olga Kurylenko, Stellan Skarsgård, Joana Ribiero, Óscar Jaenada, Jason Watkins, Paloma Boyd, Jordi Mollà, et.al.
Rating: NR
Grade: A

Cynical filmmaker Toby finds himself directing his latest film near the village where he made a student film, and finds the local shoemaker he had hired living in the delusion of being Don Quixote, the role he had in Toby’s film, and who now believes Toby to be his traveling companion, Sancho Panza. As Toby follows Quixote on his quest to rescue his lady love, he is confronted with the consequences of the film he made in his idealistic youth, and forced to reevaluate the path his life is on.

I was pleasantly surprised with this movie, which is one of only a handful of Terry Gilliam movies I’ve seen. Don Quixote seems to rest in the center of his storytelling style, with tonal shifts between the dramatic and the purposefully ridiculous, and Gilliam seems to be one of the few filmmakers who can make that type of storytelling work. The performances by Pryce and Driver are amazing as you begin to wonder if the movie is actually happening, or if stress and being overworked are causing Toby to have a mental breakdown. I’m almost completely unfamiliar with Don Quixote, so I have no idea if the movie plot parallels the book in any way.

What few special effects used appear to be decent, and the background filler isn’t really noticeable.

Fans of Terry Gilliam or any of the actors involved will likely enjoy this movie. While it may be a bit much to watch regularly, it shouldn’t grate for occasional viewings. Anyone looking for a laugh and a slightly-wacky story should enjoy the movie as well.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote is currently available to stream through Sony Crackle, and it can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.

Roswell, NM

RoswellNM

Starring: Jeanie Mason, Nathan Parsons, Michael Vlamis, Lily Cowles, Tyler Blackburn, Heather Hemmens, Michael Trevino, Trevor St. John, Karan Oberoi, et.al.
Rating: TV-14
Network: CW
Grade: B

After the research lab she works at is shut down, Liz Ortecha moves back home to Roswell, New Mexico and takes up her old job as a waitress at her father’s restaurant. There she learns that her high school crush, Max Evans, is still in town and working for the local sheriff’s department. When Liz is shot one night after work, Max appears and mysteriously heals her, and he later confides in her that he, his sister Isobel, and his best friend Michael Guerin are all aliens that crash landed in Roswell in the 40s. As strange things start happening in town with several people, including Isobel losing time, Liz helps her alien friends investigate the possibility of a fourth alien residing in town, and what this person might want from Max, Isobel, and Michael.

A reboot of the 90s series, which itself was an adaptation of a popular book series, this show is another of the CW’s surprisingly not awful new takes on a classic (of sorts) series. This version of the series seems to add in characters and bits of storyline from the book series (from what I could glean off of the free sample of the first book I was able to find). This version drops the overly saccharine, dewy-eyed school girl heroine for one that seems to be able to hold her own, and the high school drama is replaced with actual issues and real stakes. The actors all seem to have decent chemistry and all work well together.

The special effects all seem to be well done from what I can tell, and the background filler isn’t noticeable.

This show should appeal to older teens and young adults (like most CW shows nowadays). Fans of the original series (like myself) may be hesitant to watch, though they shouldn’t be. It’s very well done and actually a bit more interesting than the original (or perhaps that just me looking back with a slightly matured perspective). Anyone who doesn’t mind a bit of sci-fi added to their romance should like it as well.

Roswell, NM is currently available to stream through Netflix or one of the CW apps (CW or CW Seed), with no word as to whether or not they plan to make it available on DVD.

My Soul To Take

MySoulToTake

Directed By: Wes Craven
Starring: Max Thieriot, John Magaro, Denzel Whitaker, Zena Grey, Nick Lashaway, Paulina Olsynski, Jeremy Chu, Emily Meage, Frank Grillo, Danai Gurira, et.al.
Rating: R
Grade: D+

Sixteen years ago in the town of Riverton, on the same night a local serial killer called the Riverton Ripper died, seven children were born, several of who weren’t due for weeks or even months. Years later, those children have been raised with the rumors that they are the reincarnations of the various personalities the killer had. However, as teens are killed one by one, people begin to believe that the Ripper didn’t actually die, and that he’s attempting to seek vengeance by killing the children born the night he supposedly died.

There’s really no use in trying to mince words. This movie is not good. The characters are underdeveloped, the plot moves too quickly, there are characters and bits of plot that aren’t fully explored, and side stories that are entirely unnecessary, which considering the nearly 2-hour run time, is somewhat surprising. It honestly would have benefitted from the extra 15 or 20 minutes in order to make a more coherent movie. One of the few bright spots of the movie is Max Thieriot, who plays one of the only characters to get some kind of development.

What few special effects used appear to be decent, and the background filler isn’t really noticeable.

While I wouldn’t recommend the movie, anyone wanting a lesson in how not to make a horror/thriller should use this as their prime example. If you’re a desperate fan of Wes Craven or one of the actors involved, proceed at your own risk. This is one of the few instances in which I felt like my time had been wasted by the movie I was watching, and it’s ridiculous how easily entertained I am.

My Soul to Take is currently only available free to stream if you have HBO, but it can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.

The Boys

TheBoys

Starring: Karl Urban, Jack Quaid, Antony Starr, Erin Moriarty, Dominique McElligott, Jesse T. Usher, Laz Alonso, Chace Crawford, Tomer Capon, Karen Fukuhara, Elisabeth Shue, et.al.
Rating: TV-MA
Network: Amazon
Grade: A

When Hughie Campbell’s girlfriend is accidentally killed by the superhero A-Train right in front of him, all he really wants is to know why. Shortly thereafter, Hughie meets Billy Butcher, a cynical former cop who wants to enlist Hughie in his crusade to take down the superhero team known as the Seven, who also happen to be the most famous group of supers in the world, and Vought, the company that finances them. Agreeing to help, Hughie soon finds himself caught up in Billy’s vengeance-fueled quest as they uncover web of corruption, lies, and the disheartening reality that the world’s favorite heroes are nowhere near as righteous as they make themselves out to be.

This bleak, hyper-violent, and darkly funny take on the superhero genre takes most of its cues from Zak Snyder’s Watchmen, in which the heroes are more violent and dangerous than the people they claim to be protecting the public from. It also adds in the concept of corporatizing and franchising heroes into a for-profit business. Most of the heroes are portrayed as jaded, selfish, and slightly amoral. For the most part, the Seven are a take on DC’s Justice League, with many of the members having abilities that mirror those heroes. The actors all do well in their roles, and they all have decent chemistry.

The special effects are all very well done, and the background filler isn’t noticeable.

As stated before, this show is incredibly violent, so anyone not liking that kind of thing probably won’t want to watch this, but anyone else who also likes comic book adaptations and superheroes should enjoy this.

The Boys is currently only available to stream on Amazon Prime, with no word as to whether or not they plan to make it available on video.

Shazam!

Shazam

Directed By: David F. Sandberg
Starring: Zachary Levi, Mark Strong, Asher Angel, Jack Dylan Grazer, Adam Brody, Djimon Hounsou, Faithe Herman, Meagan Goode, et.al.
Rating: PG-13
Grade: B+

When 14 year old foster kid Billy Batson defends one of his foster siblings from bullies, he finds himself transported into a cavern, where a dying wizard bestows a gift upon him that gives him the appearance of 30-something superhero. Pursued by Dr. Thaddeus Sivana, a rejected candidate for the powers Billy now possesses, Billy enlists the help of his foster brother, Freddy, to figure out not only what his abilities are, but also how to use them. After Sivana, aided by physical manifestations of the Seven Deadly Sins, figures out Billy’s identity and threatens his new family, Billy bands together with his siblings to stop Sivana and keep their family safe.

Another one of DC’s side properties that they made in an attempt to diversify their Extended Universe (DCEU), Shazam is well-made and entertaining. Lighter in tone than most of DC’s other current films, it’s another step in the right direction to create a diversified universe, much like the one Marvel offers. The actors all work well together, and Levi, who plays Billy’s superhero persona, has the right personality to play a teen that looks like an adult. Strong, who plays Sivana, lets his natural accent slip through occasionally, but for the most part he seems to be able to keep control of it.

The special effects are all very well done, and the background filler isn’t noticeable.

Fans of the movies based on DC comics, and maybe most fans of comic book movies in general, should enjoy this. It’s fun and light-hearted, and while it doesn’t necessarily add to the Justice League spectrum, it’s still a good movie to watch, and it’s fun enough that it shouldn’t grate on rewatching. There are just enough references to past DC movies to remind you that they’re set in the same universe.

Shazam! isn’t currently available free to stream at the moment, but it can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.

Unicorn Store

UnicornStore

Directed By: Brie Larson
Starring: Brie Larson, Samuel L. Jackson, Joan Cusack, Bradley Whitford, Mamoudou Athie, Hamish Linklater, Martha McIsaac, Karan Soni, et.al.
Rating: TV-PG
Network: Netflix
Grade: B-

After failing out of art school and moving back in with her parents, 20-something dreamer Kit decides it’s time to grow up. After getting an office job through a temp agency, she receives an invitation to a place known only as The Store. There, she meets the Salesman, who tells her that she has an opportunity to buy the one thing she’s always wanted to have: a real, live unicorn. As Kit makes preparations to house and care for her unicorn, she meets Virgil, a hardware store employee who’s intrigued by her quest, as well as her unwavering belief that she will actually be acquiring the mythical creature. When she’s also presented with an opportunity to advance at her job, Kit is torn between abandoning her childhood dreams and finally becoming a responsible adult.

This movie is very much What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get. Aside from an almost painfully obvious lesson that growing up doesn’t necessarily mean letting go of your dreams or losing your sense of whimsy, there isn’t a whole lot of depth and hidden meaning. That said, the acting is fairly decent. Samuel L. Jackson seems to be having a ball playing the Salesman, and Brie Larson, who pulls double duty as both the star and the director, seems incredibly comfortable with Kit’s unendingly idealistic nature. Cusack and Whitford, who play Kit’s parents, do a great job of hovering between wanting their child to be happy and just wanting them to finally grow up.

What little special effects are used are pretty good, and the background filler isn’t noticeable.

Anyone looking to relax their mind with harmless fluff for 90 minutes or so will probably like this. The ending is relatively happy, and, as stated above, you won’t be taxed with hidden meanings. While the movie’s humor and somewhat nonsensical storyline may not appeal to everyone, anyone still in touch with their inner child should like it.

Unicorn Store is currently only available free to stream through Netflix, with no word as to whether they plan to make it available commercially.