Escape Room

EscapeRoom

Directed By: Adam Robitel
Starring: Taylor Russell, Logan Miller, Jay Ellis, Tyler Labine, Deborah Ann Woll, Nick Dodani, et.al.
Rating: PG-13
Grade: A-

Over the Thanksgiving holiday, student Zoey, grocery store stocker Ben, and stockbroker Jason are mysteriously presented with a gift of a black puzzle box from someone they know. After solving the puzzle, they find an invitation to an escape room challenge, which holds a prize of $10,000 to anyone who can escape it. After their arrival at the company site for the room, they meet three others who also received the puzzle boxes, war vet Amanda, trucker Mike, and gaming enthusiast Danny. When the escape room mechanisms are triggered, they group quickly learn that the game isn’t what they first thought, and they all fight to stay alive against a system designed to kill them.

This movie was surprisingly good. I was entirely unaware of the escape room phenomenon before seeing this, so the concept seemed to be a fairly original take on a locked room mystery. Though only three of the characters get proper introductions before the action starts, they, for the most part, get some decent background instead of just being used as blank cannon fodder to increase tensions. The actors all do well with their characters, and they all have a fair amount of chemistry with each other. The puzzles themselves are all interesting, and aren’t obvious about the solutions or the potential dangers.

The special effects are fairly well done, and the background filler isn’t noticeable.

Fans of the horror/thriller genre should enjoy this movie. While there’s very little gore, it’s actually a pretty good thriller, and while it does open with a bit of a spoiler as to who survives, there are a few decent twists along the way. Anyone wanting to watch this shouldn’t be disappointed if they have to spend money on a rental, and it’s something that can be viewed multiple times without getting too boring.

Escape Room is currently only available free to stream if you have Starz, but can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.

Long Shot

LongShot

Directed By: Jonathan Levine
Starring: Charlize Theron, Seth Rogen, June Diane Raphael, O’Shea Jackson Jr., Ravi Patel, Bob Odenkirk, Andy Serkis, Randall Park, Alexander Skarsgård, et.al.
Rating: R
Grade: C+

After quitting his job as a reporter for The Brooklyn Advocate when he believes that they have sold out, Fred Flarsky, along with his best friend Lance, attends a concert where he runs into Charlotte Field, his former babysitter and childhood crush, who is now the US Secretary of State and a potential presidential candidate in the upcoming election. Charlotte, believing her speeches need to be overhauled, hires Fred on as a staff writer to help voters relate to her more. As they reconnect and get to know each other as adults over the course of her campaign, Fred and Charlotte begin to develop feelings for each other. However, when a scandal surrounding Fred is brought to light, Charlotte must decide whether to dismiss him from the campaign and protect her reputation, or follow her heart and keep him around.

Seth Rogen seems to be one of those who can toe the line between a typical romantic comedy and the frat-style gross out comedy he’s better known for. This movie, while far better than his previous attempt at creating a hybrid gross out/RomCom, still seems to not know whether it wants to fully commit to a comedy style fully. At times it pushes into full-on RomCom territory, then slides back into gross out territory. Though, I will say, for the most part it handles to balance fairly well. Despite the fact that they seem to be an odd pairing, Rogen and Theron have a decent chemistry together, and the way the story unfolds, combined with Rogen’s strangely affable charm, it doesn’t seem entirely outside the realm of possibility that her character would be interested in his.

There aren’t many special effects used, and the background filler isn’t noticeable.

It’s hard to pinpoint a demographic for this movie. Parts of it may be too romance-y for fans of frat humor, and likewise, some of it will be too frat-y for fans of RomComs. I would suggest that most fans of either genre give it a watch. At the very least, it’s worth the price of a rental, and you may be surprised by how much you don’t hate it.

Long Shot is currently not available free to stream anywhere at the moment, but can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.

Hellboy (2019)

Hellboy2019

Directed By: Neil Marshall
Starring: David Harbour, Milla Jovovich, Daniel Dae Kim, Ian McShane, Sasha Lane, Stephen Graham, Sophie Okonedo, Thomas Haden Church, et.al.
Rating: R
Grade: B

Brought to Earth during a Nazi occult ritual during World War II, Hellboy was taken in and raised by Trevor “Broom” Bruttenhold, who, along with several of the others who were present at his summoning, formed the Bureau of Paranormal Research and Defense, or DPRD. Decades later, a creature named Grugach makes a deal with Baba Yaga to raise sorceress named Nimue who had been defeated by Arthur and Merlin so that they can seek revenge on Hellboy for the slights they believe he has dealt them over the course of his time on Earth. Teaming up with Major Ben Daimio, a member of M11 and shapeshifter, and Alice Monaghan, a civilian and powerful medium, Hellboy hunts down Nimue to prevent her from destroying the Earth, as she had attempted in the past.

This reboot of the 2004 movie is a serviceable attempt at cashing in on making R-rated comic book movies. Aside from Hellboy, Broom, and a brief appearance by Rasputin, no other characters from the first two movies appear, though one is introduced in the last few minutes. The story itself is interesting, though it seems ill-suited to the time constraints of a two hour movie. Many of the characters and fictional organizations have their backstory glossed over, despite the actually decent running time, and the story itself lags in parts and is rushed in others. Harbour does a good job of taking over the Hellboy mantle from Ron Perlman, who played the character in the two previous theatrical releases, as well as a handful of animated movies. The actors all work well together, and McShane does a good job of acting like a paternal figure.

The special effects are for the most part decent, but some of the animation, particularly of blood and other liquids, are a little off. The background filler isn’t noticeable.

Hardcore fans of the Hellboy comics will likely enjoy this movie, as well as people looking for an atypical supernatural action movie. The movie itself manages to keep from being too comic book-y. It would probably be worth the money to rent, though depending on how you feel about violence and language, parents may want to view it before letting small children watch.

Hellboy (2019) is currently not available free to stream anywhere at the moment, but can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.

Captain Marvel

CaptainMarvel

Directed By: Anna Boden & Ryan Fleck
Starring: Brie Larson, Samuel L. Jackson, Jude Law, Clark Gregg, Gemma Chan, Annette Bening, Djimon Hounsou, Ben Mendelsohn, Lee Pace, Lashana Lynch, et.al.
Rating: PG-13
Grade: B+

When Kree Starforce officer Vers is taken by Skrull operatives and has her memories searched, she is shown events she can’t recall living through. After escaping, she crash lands on Earth, where she meets Agent Nick Fury. Coming to a truce of sorts, Fury agrees to help her get information about Dr. Wendy Lawson, one of the people in the memories that were searched, who was working on an experimental engine that the Skrulls were looking for. As she spends more time on Earth, she eventually learns that her name is actually Captain Carol Danvers, an Air Force pilot who went missing after the experimental craft she was test piloting crashed and killed Dr. Lawson. No longer certain of who she can and can’t trust, Carol joins forces with Fury in an effort to unravel the mystery behind her missing memories and the source of the extraordinary powers she possesses.

Captain Marvel is the 21st movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), and is the first one to center on a female superhero. The introduction of Captain Marvel was long-awaited, and planned as far back as the first Avengers movie in 2012. The movie itself is very good, but falls a little short of amazing. Many fans have been critical of Marvel for ensuring they had a profitable idea before venturing into diversifying their leads, but wait was mostly worth it. It was interesting to see a couple of fan-favorite characters before the “official” start of the MCU, though the CGI de-aging was a bit disconcerting at times. The new characters introduced all fit into the established universe well, and Marvel continues to stock their roster of A-List actors in their movies. The storyline itself is fairly easy to follow, and while the twist near the end may not be jaw-dropping, it’s nice to see that they’re still trying to keep fans on their toes after 10+ years.

The special effects are all very well done, as is the case with nearly every Marvel movie, and the background filler isn’t noticeable.

Fans of the MCU, as well as anyone looking for a movie starring a kick-ass heroine, should enjoy this movie. Since it’s an origin story, you don’t necessarily need to be familiar with the rest of the MCU movies in order to understand what’s going on. Young girls in particular will probably like a movie with a strong female lead, which, while there are more movies with them being made, there’s still a serious lack positive role models and women carrying movies.

Captain Marvel is not currently available free to stream anywhere, but can be rented through Redbox or Netflix home delivery, or purchased at any participating store or on-line retailer.